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Dog Teeth Extraction Recovery: 6 Things You Need To Know

There are cases where your dog needs to undergo tooth extraction. This is necessary to promote your canine’s overall health. However, this also means that you need to do the right aftercare.

Various gum and dental problems would lead to the need for teeth to be pulled out to avoid infection. If this is the case with your canine, it would be better to get the procedure done right away. However, you need to know that you have to act on the needs of your buddy right after the extraction.

Dog teeth extraction recovery is a crucial stage. During this period, your dog would have special needs that you have to address. We would be going over the necessary steps that you have to take right after you leave the vet’s clinic.

Why Tooth Extraction Is Necessary

Just like in humans, dogs can suffer from diseases affecting the gums and teeth. Dental diseases may lead to complications affecting your pet’s overall health. Your dog’s heart, liver, lungs, and kidney may suffer.

Aside from severe complications, dental diseases are also the leading cause of bad breath and loss of appetite in dogs. Poor oral health would lead to having an irritable canine. Given these circumstances, you need to address the problem right away to promote your canine’s well-being.

Expect Your Dog to Feel Pain

When your dog needs to undergo teeth extraction, it’s rare for the procedure to last overnight. Unless all the teeth need to be pulled out or the animal is old and frail, this situation happens rarely.

You just have to drop the animal at your vet’s clinic and leave it there. You can ask your vet to give you a call when you can pick up your pet or ask in advance. After that, taking care of your pet would be all up to you.dog-teeth-extraction-recovery-3

When your buddy just had a tooth extracted, it’s normal for your canine to be in pain. Just think about the last time you had an appointment with your dentist to get a tooth pulled out. The pain may not be life threatening, but your pet may show discomfort.

It’s normal for your pet to have a sore mouth for the next two to three days after the tooth extraction. However, it’s normal for the soreness to stay for up to five days.

Do not be alarmed if you see a bit of blood in the food bowl and every time your pet takes a drink of water. However, the amount of blood should not be too much. If you notice that there is excessive bleeding, you need to take the animal back to the vet right away since this is indicates hemorrhage which is dangerous for any animal.

Dogs May Need Pain Relievers and Antibiotics

When you have a dog that just had a tooth pulled out, it may be necessary to give them pain relievers. When the anesthesia wears off, your dog is bound to feel the pain. It only makes sense to have pain relievers at your disposal.

Often, vets will give you instructions on how to care for your canine after the surgery. Be sure to follow instructions on how much antibiotics to give your dog.

For the first night after the extraction, keeping your dog indoors would be advisable. You also need to anticipate that your animal would not be back to its old self at least for the first few days since the anesthetic is still affecting its system. This is not a cause for alarm, so do not worry when your dog seems to be less active than it usually is.

What to Feed Your Dog after Teeth Extraction

Your canine could have stomach issues after teeth extraction. Hence, fetching your dog from the vet’s clinic, plan its meal well ahead of time.

As much as possible, give it a bland meal first.  Feeding your dog with chicken or white fish would be a good choice of food. It would also be good to increase the amount of water that you give your canine.

Dry food is the better choice if you want your dog to have healthy teeth but for the time being, you can feed your canine with canned food. If you plan to stick to giving it regular dog food, decrease the size to half right after teeth extraction.  You can feed it with normal portions after a few days.

If your pet had all of its teeth removed, canned food may be the best choice for the first few days.

Right after the surgery, try to take away some of the toys or the hard stuff that it has been chewing on. Also, try to limit any active play for the next three days or so.

Pay Attention to Your Pet

While it is understandable that your canine would not be back to its old mischievous self, right away but this doesn’t mean that you have to be complacent. There are instances where dogs suffer from complications after tooth extraction. So, be extra attentive to any signs that could indicate that something is wrong with your pet.

The most common signs of complications after a tooth extraction include excessive swelling which should subside by the end of the fifth day. If your dog shows a sudden change in appetite or habits, that could also be alarming. Heavy bleeding is another red flag as well as drooling.dog-teeth-extraction-recovery-(5)

While some of this may be normal, ask your vet when you should be alarmed. Dogs, unlike people, could not tell you that it is suffering although they can act it out.

After the extraction, going for a checkup is a must. Your vet could request that you bring your dog back to the cleaning 7 to 10 days after the procedure to make sure that everything is fine.

Maintain Proper Oral Hygiene

The first thing that landed your dog in the vet’s office for a tooth extraction is poor oral health. Now that your canine is past the pain, you should make sure that you will maintain proper oral health from now on.

After an extraction, it is a good idea to rinse your dog’s mouth with a chlorhexidine solution. Go for a 0.2 percent solution and rinse your dog’s mouth once or twice a day depending on your vet’s recommendation.

Final Thoughts

While this is a good suggestion, always ask for your vet’s opinion. Your dog’s doctor might have better suggestions or it is possible that such solution is not ideal for your canines.

Tooth problems more common in dogs than you might think. In fact, 80 percent of canines develop one form of periodontal disease or another when it reaches age 2.dog-teeth-extraction-recovery-2

Although most cases are not life threatening, you need to take the necessary measures to safeguard your canine’s oral health.

Always remember that dogs are not too different from humans. Right after their tooth has been pulled out; dog teeth extraction recovery time is necessary. During this period, your four-legged buddy would require your care to get better.

As a responsible owner, you should also look out for warning signs that could indicate problems. By knowing what needs to be done and when to be alarmed, you can ensure that your dog will recover from a tooth extraction without any problems.

Click Here to Leave a Comment Below 22 comments
LeAnn Navratil - May 23, 2017

My dog had some teeth extracted about a month ago ever since she won’t let you rub or touch under her jaw on one side she starts itching it and doesn’t let me trim her nails on the same side in the front!!! What is going on????

Reply
    Brenda Leary - July 21, 2017

    Sorry for the late reply. Recently the comment function on our website broke down. Now I have fixed it.
    This is a strange behaviour I haven’t seen before. You should take her to the local veterinarian for better advices. Please share us what happen afterward.
    Thank you for your support.

    Reply
KEN FULL - July 23, 2017

MY 10 LB MINI DOXIE HAD A DENTAL CLEANING ON TUESDAY INCLUDING 7 EXTRACTIONS.SHE HASN’T HAD HER APPETITE SINCE THEN.ANY IDEA WHAT WOULD CAUSE APPETITE LOSS?SHE ISN’T ACTING SICK,JUST DOESN’T WANT TO EAT?FOLLOW UP EXAM AND BLOODWORK WERE FINE. ANY HELP WOULD BE APPRECIATED.THANK YOU!

Reply
    Brenda Leary - July 26, 2017

    Hi Ken,
    Just like us, dogs suffer pain after taking teeth extraction. You may need to change her diet a bit. Try to soften the food with water, make it easier for your dog to eat.

    Reply
Yvonne - August 28, 2017

My 13 year old lab had a lower tooth extraction and surgery lasted 1 hour and 20 minutes. Tomorrow is seven days and he is licking his paws a lot and panting. His pain meds run out today and I think he may still be in pain? His regular vet is on vacation and I left a message for the vet on staff. I am worried about his comfort. He is still eating well and I have kept him on soft foods only – rehydrated human grade and soak his dry in bone broth to soften it. Drinking was very uncomfortable for him until five days after surgery.

Reply
    Brenda Leary - August 29, 2017

    Hi Yvonne,
    For your dog conditions, they may come from other diseases.
    First, you need to check your dog legs. Are there any conditions present such as limping or swelling in the foot? Could he be allergic to the new food? If it does not match any medical condition, it may be your dog developing a new behaviour, and behaviour modification techniques can be employed.
    For your dog panting, does he drink at all? If he is not, you should find ways to keep him hydrated. It is now summer, and hot weather might give your dog a heatstroke.
    Best wishes for you.

    Reply
Angel - September 5, 2017

Hi my dog is and 8 yr old Pomeranian she is very smart and today one of her back teeth fell out. I was walking into the house and she looked like her jaw was cracking ,well it sounded like that. Then I went to put my finger into her mouth to see and her tooth fell out. She seemed relieved. Yes I keep her well groomed and brush her teeth regularly and she eats only freeze dried food and drinks whenever she is thirsty. Question is there anything I can give her from home that will help with pain I feel she has no appotie and won’t drink either, so is there anything over the counter that I can give her for pain, or should I take her to vet just in case. I’m disabled and am trying to avoid a trip.
Thank you for your help!!

Reply
    Brenda Leary - September 7, 2017

    Hi Angel,
    After dental treatment, dogs usually find difficult eating and drinking. Since your dog tooth fell out naturally, I advice you to see a veteran for a check-up. If you cannot travel there, check if there is any hose call veterinarian.
    Does she express any sign of pain when defecating? Is there any strange sign in her feces (blood, weird color)? If yes, then your dog might have gastrointestinal distress.
    You said that your dog only eats dried food, so she might have some kidney stone. Please, check on her while she is urinating. Is she in pain? Does she struggle to urinate? Is there any strange sign? In either case, you must take her to the vet immediately. These are very serious problem that cannot be ignored.
    With these symptoms, you really need to contact a vet. You said that you have difficult in traveling, so can you check if there is any house call veterinarian for diagnosis. If the problem is not severe, they can give her some medication and you won’t have to take her to any vet clinic. If not, then surgery is a must. Please act fast.
    Best wishes for you.

    Reply
Noreen - September 6, 2017

Hi! My dog is a 3 year old Shih Tzu and just had prophylaxis and 4 tooth extraction yesterday. We offered him water and canned food but he wouldn’t have any. Is it something I should be worried about?
Thank you!

Reply
    Brenda Leary - September 7, 2017

    Hi Noreen,
    Did your dog receive any intravenous fluids during his dental procedure? It is possible that your dog still feels hydrated after the dental treatment. However, you should keep trying to feed him. Make his favorite food and soften it. Prevent him from exercise for some days. If he still does not drink or eat, you should contact your veteran.
    Best wishes for you.

    Reply
Marina - September 19, 2017

Nice aricle! Just adopted a 13 year old chihuahua. Her breath is horrendous! I can even get her to let me look at her teeth yet! She doesn’t care for any of the treats I’ve tried 🙁 tomorrow I will buy some meat baby food and try that. Ugh.

Reply
Lee - September 20, 2017

Hi, my 12 year old border terrier went in the vets on Monday 11th September and had 15 teeth removed. He was a rescue dog and we don’t think had too great a start in life. After the operation the vet released him and we brought him home to recover. The last time (about 3 years ago) he had teeth removed he was instantly prescribed antibiotics to aid recovery on his release but this time he was not.
I became a little concerned about him 2-3 nights ago as he has developed a nasal discharge for what seems like snot, and a lot of it. I know dogs cough inwards and this nasal discharge makes him sound as though he’s choking. Anyway today I have taken him into the vets (his second visit since the operation, the first check up he was confirmed to have a gum infection and prescribed Kesium), where she tried to flush his mouth out but he was having none of it so he has now been booked in this Friday to under go a second bout of general anaesthetic to clean a fistula that has developed. His Kesium has been changed too, to Antirobe.
Should the vet have originally prescribed my elderly dog with antibiotics in veiw of his age and the amount of teeth that he had removed.

Reply
    Brenda Leary - September 26, 2017

    Hi Lee,
    First of all, thanks for reading our blog.
    We are just bloggers who love dogs and want to write about them, not veterans. So we do not understand why the vet didnt prescribed.
    For multiple teeth extraction, it is recommended to use antibiotic. For more information, you should contact other veterans.
    Best wishes for you and your Terrier, Lee.

    Reply
Brandy - October 4, 2017

My dog is 10 yrs old and has very bad teeth. I called around and I cannot afford the prices to get them removed. The teeth seem to be hanging on by a thread but they cause her pain. I want to help her but without hundreds of dollars what can I do? Can I remove them myself?

Reply
    Brenda Leary - October 5, 2017

    Hi Brandy,
    Teeth extraction is a very difficult process. I would advice you not to do the extraction yourself. You can look for local association to provide financial assistance.
    Best wishes for you.

    Reply
Ruth - October 6, 2017

Hi, We have a 17 year old doxie who started bleeding from the mouth. Vet says he has gingivitis and needs all teeth removed…except for an occasional seizure, he is in good health. Should we do this or is it putting good money after bad, and we should just put him down. He can’t possibly live much longer than 17, can he? Need help with this difficult decision. In addition to the dilemma, our carpets are white and the damage from blood is very extensive and expensive.

Reply
    Brenda Leary - October 7, 2017

    Hi Ruth,
    As dog lovers, we would recommend you to take care of his gingivitis. However, 17 year old is an old age for dogs. We think if you not removing his teeth, you should try to reduce the pain and gets ready to say goodbye to your old friend.
    Best wishes for you and your doxie.

    Reply
Kim - October 10, 2017

My dog tooth came out today.
How do I clean the open wound so it won’t get infected

Reply
    Brenda Leary - October 15, 2017

    Hi Kim,
    Sorry for the late reply. I’m not a vet, this is just my experience when my Luna lost her tooth.
    – Check if the tooth was lost completely. If a section left in the gum, there are many health problems your dog may get.
    – Check if your dog have swallow the tooth. Although have a low risk, the digestion can cause problems.
    – Check if any other teeth are loose.
    – Call the dentist for more information.
    I hope it can help you.

    Reply
Jo.Ann Pate - October 18, 2017

my rescue dog just had 12 teeth pulled and now she can not keep her tongue in her mouth and she chews on it. what can be done to help her?

Reply
    Brenda Leary - October 21, 2017

    Hi Ann,
    You shouldnt be worry about it. After teeth extraction, there is not enough to keep the tongue inside. The dog usually leave the tongue out when sleeping, otherwise it usually not.
    Dog tongue is also prone to be bitten. It would not take much damage from chewing.
    In the upcoming days, keep observing and taking note if there are any other strange behaviours. If there anything alarmed you, you should contact your vet.

    Reply

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